wpf1432ef8.jpg

Insects

We do our best to encourage wildlife and bio-diversity in the garden and meadows.

 

 

 

 

wp68ab11e2_0f.jpg
wp852fb082_0f.jpg

Left, these photos are of the Turnip Sawfly (Athalia rosae) which is quite distinctive with an orange thorax, abdomen and legs contrasted with black head and 'shoulder pads'.

wp9ead3d0b_0f.jpg

We think this is Lampronata setosas, a large ichneumon wasp which parasitises the larvae of the Goat Moth which live in wood, hence the very long ovipositor. It is sitting on the arm of a bench , the arm is 25mm wide.

This Lesser Stag Beetle (Dorcus parallelipipedus) was spotted on one of our hose pipes.

wp8fdbd2d0_0f.jpg

Left, is a Tawny Longhorn beetle (Paracorymbia fulva) on a Thistle flower.

Below, is a Bloodsucker beetle (Rhagonycha fulva) on a flower of the Field Scabious (Knautia arvensis)

wp0fe1f483_0f.jpg
wpfcc6b6f5_0f.jpg
wpa844a34e.jpg

Above, a Wasp Beetle (Clytus arietis) which mimics a wasp to fool would-be predators.

wp13fb2c6a.jpg

Above, a Picture-winged Fly Xyphosia miliaria, attracted by our patch of creeping thistle.

wpf40921e4_0f.jpg
wp682a8646_0f.jpg

The creeping thistle attracts blackfly, and within days ladybirds, in this case a 2 spot ladybird (Adalia bipunctata) lays eggs so that when the larvae hatch they have a ready supply of blackfly to eat. Good example of a natural predator and prey cycle which is so important in organic farming and gardening.

wp8dd2efd1.jpg
wp1ddd79be_0f.jpg

A capsid or mirid bug Capsodes sulcatus .

Cinnamon Bug - Corizus hyoscyami

wpbab063e9.png

Thick-legged Flower Beetle (Oedemera nobilis), on the left is a female and the other two photos are of the male with their big thighs clearly visible.

wp48a9a08f_0f.jpg
wp7f88fdc9_0f.jpg

Above is a Common Green Grasshopper (Omocestus viridulus) and left a Great Green Bush Cricket (Tettigonia viridissima)  both enjoy the long grass in our meadows.